(Dis)Place

As part of the exhibition the artist reflected on his own personal stories and association with the objects, particularly the water, and encouraged viewers to do likewise. 
As part of the performance, the artist will also displace the water with several of the objects surrounding the water-filled containers.  As well as the larger and small stones the artist will displace the water with smaller receptacles.


About the Installation

An exhibition event of multimedia installations and live performances, exploring unstable environments and shifting identities in the Atrium an The Cass in Aldgate. 

In the residues of past objects and the dust of things unsettled, we find a space to contemplate fleeting moments and the temporariness of existence. This is the outcome of Installation & Site, a Theatre Arts studio exploring borderline practices between performance and art exhibits, led by artist and Senior Lecturer Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso.

 Featuring new works by Norman Bailey, Deborah Cacciapuoti, Belen Gonzalez, Lucy Holl, Olivier Kitenge, Sofia Masgana, Kamryn McIntosh, Molly Thompson, Veera Vaisanen, Nikolaos Vasileiou and Amy Vinten.

Tutor, Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso, whose artistic work also focuses on the borderlines between theatre and fine art commented: “This is one of my favourite ways to see the students’ own creative journeys. I am proud of the works they have created, which draw on personal experience and their own complex identities. We want them to think outside of the box and outside of given disciplines: to think as interdisciplinary, versatile artists, ready for an increasingly diverse industry.

Students studying on two different programmes at London Met’s Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design explored the crossovers and relationship between performance and installation art. The ‘In the Dust of Things Unsettled’ exhibition was the culmination of a part of the module entitled Installation and Site which was studied by both and undergraduate students.

These London Met students were able to access an exclusive view of the archives in live art at all of these venues and then went on to make their own installations which included durational performances, video art and sculptural assemblages.